masqueradehfx:

bl-ossomed:



Mercury, Venus, and Saturn align with the Pyramids of Giza for the first time in 2,737 years on December 3, 2012

i’ve never reblogged anything so fast

Fav

The last time this happened, an Egyptian Pharaoh was there to see it.

masqueradehfx:

bl-ossomed:

Mercury, Venus, and Saturn align with the Pyramids of Giza for the first time in 2,737 years on December 3, 2012

i’ve never reblogged anything so fast

Fav

The last time this happened, an Egyptian Pharaoh was there to see it.

(Source: arpleiadian, via sailor-m0on)

"i shouldn’t be jealous
but it’s just that
parts of you come alive
at the mere mention of her name
that my entire being
cannot awaken;
and every time
you smile like that,
i swear -
a butterfly dies
inside my chest."
- m.v., i wish you could admit what i can see. (via findingwordsforthoughts)

rrosequartz:

destructive-creature:

"At Rio Americano High School in Sacramento CA, a student named Dejza, was violently assaulted by a vice principal, Matt Collier, for attempting to take back a piece of art with a political message that the administration didn’t like. She was put in a chokehold and slammed against the desk. When she tried to resist this unlawful abuse of authority, she was slammed and held onto the ground. Matt Collier laid on top of her, crushing her with his weight. Dejza could not breathe, and begged Collier to get off of her. Luckily, another faculty member came in and ended the situation. Dejza went to see a doctor for severe whiplash, and yesterday was her first day of physical therapy. Despite this being blatantly wrong and illegal, the administration has put her on suspension for resisting, and Collier was not disciplined. On the fifth day of her suspension, she will attend a meeting held by bias members of the administration to determine if she will be expelled.

They have tried to silence anyone who speaks out on social media, but today we have gathered in person for a silent sit-in protest.

Dejza has been wronged, and brutalized, and now she is receiving punishment. They’ve tried to silence her. They’ve tried to silence us.” -Grant Wright 

One of my friends Grant posted this on facebook and even though im not in Sacramento I want to help. This girl has been mistreated by a full grown man who may never be punished. I want to help spread awareness. So please, spread this around. Let people know that this is NOT okay. The more support we have, the better. 

i’m so proud to have been a part of this today but you guys please please please please reblog/spread this around any way you possibly can it’s so important and her story needs to be heard by people outside of our city because what this man did is so so so incredibly far from okay

this is home for me.

In solidarity with my you all

(via lunalunadameunatuna)

latinosexuality:

Latinx Cervivors: yours truly in the center (l) Vanessa Santiago, (c) S. Lugo, (r) Pattie Murillo-Casa). We represent those who have survived either cervical cancer and/or HPV and treatment. We are working to help folks, especially Latinx’s and LatiNegrx’s, become more aware of HPV, cervical cancer, and the testing and treatments available. Latinx have the highest rates of cervical cancer, Black women have the highest mortality rates because of cervical cancer and Latinx are 2nd; thus LatiNegrxs are at the top!
I’ve been very vocal and public with my treatments (which continue to this day as I still have abnormal cells on my cervix and will be needing a LEEP  before 2014 is over) because I believe it’s time for folks who have a cervix (and those who love/care for us) to be aware of treatment options, availability, financial support, what HPV is, cancers associated, and demystifying stereotypes about HPV. 
Below is part of my story I shared for Latinx Heritage Month. For more information about Cervivor visit our website. 
_________
I helped to co-found Tamika & Friends, Inc. and I’ve been a trained and practicing sexologist for over 15 years. I’ve known about HPV for years, much more than the average person, so when I was diagnosed with HPV 2 years ago I knew what to expect. I was also scared, embarrassed, and ashamed. I was uninsured, as I am to this day, and did not have health insurance. My local Planned Parenthood had tested me for HPV and it is where I went to get my treatment: colpscopy, cryotherapy, pap smear, and future HPV tests.I didn’t tell anyone because I knew that folks already think HPV is linked to sexual promiscuity. Although I was living my life on my own terms, I wanted my own privacy too and to avoid any slut-shaming folks wanted to direct towards me. I only told a few friends, Tamika being one of them. I went on to diagnose myself in ways that are not often helpful or useful, but that happen when we have access to information and the internet.  There was also the embarrassment of being poor and uninsured. So often those of us who do not have full-time employment, work several jobs to make ends meet, and do the best we can to survive are seen as disposable, irresponsible, and a drain on resources. To share with folks that I now was sick and needed care added another level to that shame. I had to realize that if there were no other folks discussing their HPV experiences, I could help begin that conversation among Latinxs and the Black community in the same way Tamika was beginning conversations about HPV and cervical cancer. With my diagnosis and requirements for care, I chose to abstain from sexual activity with other people for almost a year. When I met my partner now, 9 months after my HPV positive test, I had just had a normal pap test result and an HPV negative test result. Before having sexual intercourse or activity we discussed our sexual health history. I shared my HPV infection and treatment. My partner was and remains supportive. Today, I test HPV negative, but I had an abnormal pap smear. I now need LEEP to remove abnormal cells on my cervix. This means nothing inside my vaginal canal for 4-6 weeks. That means no vaginal penetration with my partner or an object, or using tampons when I menstruate.So often people say that HPV does not mean you are or have to be sexually promiscuous. This is true, at the same time it isolates folks who choose to have consensual sexual intercourse with different partners throughout their lives. To have HPV is to be human as one medical doctor has shared. I agree. I also agree that no matter what choices people have made about their own sexual pleasure and sexuality they deserve to be treated with dignity, integrity, and respect. Knowing the rates of HPV and cervical cancer among Latinas and Black women in the US, as an AfraLatina my rates remain high as I am a member of both groups. I also identify as a queer woman of Color. Many of us don’t always go to receive GYN care to avoid judgmental and homophobic medical care. I chose Planned Parenthood for my reproductive health care because they make attempts to be inclusive of many people based on sexual orientation and gender identity. I also had a friend who is a healer who works there and is my primary provider, so I feel safe with them. For this reason, I choose to share my story. I choose to discuss HPV and cervical cancer with everyone who is willing to listen. This is why I began working with Cervivor. 
I am still uninsured today. I am still with my partner. I am still prioritizing my reproductive and sexual health the best ways I can. I am worthy of care and my community supports me.
_________
“Every year from September 15th through October 15th Americans celebrate National Hispanic Heritage month. During this time, America honors the cultures and contributions of Hispanic Americans. At Cervivor, we celebrate the lives of the amazing Latinas who are part of our Cervivor family, whether they are survivors, volunteers, friends or care givers. It’s so important to take time during this celebration to educate women about HPV and cervical cancer because Latinas have the highest rates of cervical cancer out of all groups of women, and they have the second highest mortality rate after African American women.

Cervivor, along with our partners like the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, are continuing to fight against the stigma of HPV and encourage women get screened regularly. The more information Latina communities have about HPV and Cervical Cancer, the faster we can erase the stigma around HPV and decrease the incidence rate of it developing to Cervical Cancer. Working together, we can fight to increase accessibility to health care for all women, and break down the barriers that prevent women from getting the care they need.
Cervivor continues to celebrate the all the beautiful women who are part of our community. Cervical Cancer is a preventable cancer, and no woman should have to suffer from or die from this disease because of stigma around HPV or barriers to health screenings and care. Help raise awareness about how HPV and Cervical Cancer affect Latina women. Share this Post. Visit the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health at latinainstitute.org. Schedule an appointment with your doctor to get screened and understand your risk for HPV and Cervical Cancer. And join Cervivor to stay connected and learn more about how to end Cervical Cancer.”

latinosexuality:

Latinx Cervivors: yours truly in the center (l) Vanessa Santiago, (c) S. Lugo, (r) Pattie Murillo-Casa). We represent those who have survived either cervical cancer and/or HPV and treatment. We are working to help folks, especially Latinx’s and LatiNegrx’s, become more aware of HPV, cervical cancer, and the testing and treatments available. Latinx have the highest rates of cervical cancer, Black women have the highest mortality rates because of cervical cancer and Latinx are 2nd; thus LatiNegrxs are at the top!

I’ve been very vocal and public with my treatments (which continue to this day as I still have abnormal cells on my cervix and will be needing a LEEP  before 2014 is over) because I believe it’s time for folks who have a cervix (and those who love/care for us) to be aware of treatment options, availability, financial support, what HPV is, cancers associated, and demystifying stereotypes about HPV. 

Below is part of my story I shared for Latinx Heritage Month. For more information about Cervivor visit our website

_________

I helped to co-found Tamika & Friends, Inc. and I’ve been a trained and practicing sexologist for over 15 years. I’ve known about HPV for years, much more than the average person, so when I was diagnosed with HPV 2 years ago I knew what to expect. I was also scared, embarrassed, and ashamed. I was uninsured, as I am to this day, and did not have health insurance. My local Planned Parenthood had tested me for HPV and it is where I went to get my treatment: colpscopy, cryotherapy, pap smear, and future HPV tests.

I didn’t tell anyone because I knew that folks already think HPV is linked to sexual promiscuity. Although I was living my life on my own terms, I wanted my own privacy too and to avoid any slut-shaming folks wanted to direct towards me. I only told a few friends, Tamika being one of them. I went on to diagnose myself in ways that are not often helpful or useful, but that happen when we have access to information and the internet.  There was also the embarrassment of being poor and uninsured. So often those of us who do not have full-time employment, work several jobs to make ends meet, and do the best we can to survive are seen as disposable, irresponsible, and a drain on resources. To share with folks that I now was sick and needed care added another level to that shame. I had to realize that if there were no other folks discussing their HPV experiences, I could help begin that conversation among Latinxs and the Black community in the same way Tamika was beginning conversations about HPV and cervical cancer. 

With my diagnosis and requirements for care, I chose to abstain from sexual activity with other people for almost a year. When I met my partner now, 9 months after my HPV positive test, I had just had a normal pap test result and an HPV negative test result. Before having sexual intercourse or activity we discussed our sexual health history. I shared my HPV infection and treatment. My partner was and remains supportive. Today, I test HPV negative, but I had an abnormal pap smear. I now need LEEP to remove abnormal cells on my cervix. This means nothing inside my vaginal canal for 4-6 weeks. That means no vaginal penetration with my partner or an object, or using tampons when I menstruate.

So often people say that HPV does not mean you are or have to be sexually promiscuous. This is true, at the same time it isolates folks who choose to have consensual sexual intercourse with different partners throughout their lives. To have HPV is to be human as one medical doctor has shared. I agree. I also agree that no matter what choices people have made about their own sexual pleasure and sexuality they deserve to be treated with dignity, integrity, and respect. 

Knowing the rates of HPV and cervical cancer among Latinas and Black women in the US, as an AfraLatina my rates remain high as I am a member of both groups. I also identify as a queer woman of Color. Many of us don’t always go to receive GYN care to avoid judgmental and homophobic medical care. I chose Planned Parenthood for my reproductive health care because they make attempts to be inclusive of many people based on sexual orientation and gender identity. I also had a friend who is a healer who works there and is my primary provider, so I feel safe with them. For this reason, I choose to share my story. I choose to discuss HPV and cervical cancer with everyone who is willing to listen. This is why I began working with Cervivor. 

I am still uninsured today. I am still with my partner. I am still prioritizing my reproductive and sexual health the best ways I can. I am worthy of care and my community supports me.

_________

Every year from September 15th through October 15th Americans celebrate National Hispanic Heritage month. During this time, America honors the cultures and contributions of Hispanic Americans. At Cervivor, we celebrate the lives of the amazing Latinas who are part of our Cervivor family, whether they are survivors, volunteers, friends or care givers. It’s so important to take time during this celebration to educate women about HPV and cervical cancer because Latinas have the highest rates of cervical cancer out of all groups of women, and they have the second highest mortality rate after African American women.

Cervivor, along with our partners like the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, are continuing to fight against the stigma of HPV and encourage women get screened regularly. The more information Latina communities have about HPV and Cervical Cancer, the faster we can erase the stigma around HPV and decrease the incidence rate of it developing to Cervical Cancer. Working together, we can fight to increase accessibility to health care for all women, and break down the barriers that prevent women from getting the care they need.

Cervivor continues to celebrate the all the beautiful women who are part of our community. Cervical Cancer is a preventable cancer, and no woman should have to suffer from or die from this disease because of stigma around HPV or barriers to health screenings and care. 
Help raise awareness about how HPV and Cervical Cancer affect Latina women. Share this Post. Visit the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health at latinainstitute.org. Schedule an appointment with your doctor to get screened and understand your risk for HPV and Cervical Cancer. And join Cervivor to stay connected and learn more about how to end Cervical Cancer.”

sicosa:

~La Pareja~
I just wanted to see some queer latinx art sooo. This was fun to do because of the lighting and it was not fun to do because of the lighting.Denim is tough. Branches are tough, leaves are tough. Flesh is fun and flexible. I wanted expressive strokes! I think I delivered kinda. As with every piece I learned a thing or two.
Hope someone out there enjoys!

sicosa:

~La Pareja~

I just wanted to see some queer latinx art sooo. This was fun to do because of the lighting and it was not fun to do because of the lighting.Denim is tough. Branches are tough, leaves are tough. Flesh is fun and flexible. I wanted expressive strokes! I think I delivered kinda. As with every piece I learned a thing or two.

Hope someone out there enjoys!

(via irresistible-revolution)

"Day of the Dead draws near (November 1st for the deceased children and November 2nd for deceased adults), an opportunity for us to nourish and be nourished by our spirit allies, our family members who have crossed over. Just the opposite of Halloween, Day of the Dead is a day to remember our connections to the other side. These spirits are not ghouls come to frighten us, but ancestors who guide and protect us."
- Sandra Cisneros (via thisisnotlatinx)

(via saboramii)

peircethebvbjackie:

•BISEXUALITY IS NOT A PHASE

•FEMINISM IS NOT ABOUT BEING BETTER THAN MEN

•RAPE IS NOT ENJOYABLE

•SEXUALITY IS NOT A CHOICE

•ANXIETY IS NOT “CUTE”

•EATING DISORDERS ARE NOT A BODY TYPE

(via arianathepoet)

fevra:

have u ever had a depersonalization moment when you look at yourself in the mirror and think wow this person is me and i have this body and this life and everything feels so strange why am i me and not someone else

(via emorenita)